Plantastic Mysteries: Did You Know that Plants Talk to Each Other?

Plantastic Mysteries: Did You Know that Plants Talk to Each Other?

Feb 26, 2014

We are starting this new series called Plantastic Mysteries to dig up cool facts, stories, secrets and mysteries about plants, because plants are just amazing! So yeah, plants talk to each other. They’re basically telling each other secrets in our face and behind our backs, so let’s be nice to them.

Via the New Yorker by Michael Pollen’s The Intelligent Plant, he writes that, “Plants are able to sense and optimally respond to so many environmental variables—light, water, gravity, temperature, soil structure, nutrients, toxins, microbes, herbivores, chemical signals from other plants—that there may exist some brainlike information-processing system to integrate the data and coördinate a plant’s behavioral response. The “sessile life style,” as plant biologists term it, calls for an extensive and nuanced understanding of one’s immediate environment, since the plant has to find everything it needs, and has to defend itself, while remaining fixed in place. A highly developed sensory apparatus is required to locate food and identify threats. Scientists have since found that the tips of plant roots, in addition to sensing gravity, moisture, light, pressure, and hardness, can also sense volume, nitrogen, phosphorus, salt, various toxins, microbes, and chemical signals from neighboring plants. Roots about to encounter an impenetrable obstacle or a toxic substance change course before they make contact with it. Roots can tell whether nearby roots are self or other and, if other, kin or stranger. Normally, plants compete for root space with strangers, but, when researchers put four closely related Great Lakes sea-rocket plants (Cakile edentula) in the same pot, the plants restrained their usual competitive behaviors and shared resources.”

Another study shows that willow trees, poplars and sugar maples can warn each other about insect attacks: Intact, undamaged trees near ones that are infested with hungry bugs begin pumping out bug-repelling chemicals to ward off attack. They somehow know what their neighbors are experiencing, and react to it. The mind-bending implication was that brainless trees could send, receive and interpret messages. — wired

Recent posts

ORGANIC FRESH BASIL PESTO! #WallToTable

ORGANIC FRESH BASIL PESTO! #WallToTable

Sep 16, 2015
Fresh Basil Pesto is easy to make and literally takes three minutes! Basil has many healthy benefits such as detoxify...
HOW TO USE EDIBLE FLOWERS THIS SUMMER

HOW TO USE EDIBLE FLOWERS THIS SUMMER

Aug 05, 2015
As much as we love flowers for brightening up our living room or kitchen table, eating them is more of a thorny issue...