Plant Inspiration | Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree

Aug 30, 2013

Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree (Ficus lyrata)

Sun: Moderate to bright light. This plant is very good at telling you whether it is getting too much or not enough light. Not enough light and it will reach and look leggy and it may drop some leaves. If you have leaves that are turning whitish then it is receiving too much light.

Zone: Likes to be in temperatures around 60-75 degrees F. Perfect for indoors. Can be outdoors but may need to be moved inside during very cold or hot times, and this plant likes to stay in one place. So we suggest keeping them indoors.

Soil: Your favorite indoor potting mix, and like we always say- with good drainage and go organic if you can!

Water: Too much water is bad thing for Fiddle Leaf. They are susceptible to root or stem rot, so they only need moderate to low amounts of water. Letting them dry between watering will keep this plant happy.

Habitat: Originating from Western Africa, these plants have beautiful large violin shaped leaves. Can be found in tree and shrub forms, so for your planters we suggest the shrub forms! Fiddle Leaf can grow 3-10 ft indoors and even larger outdoors. Pruning will do worlds of wonders to controlling height and density.

Tip: It is one of the easiest of the Ficus to grow- perfect for beginners! To keep the large leaves looking shiny take a cloth and wipe the dust from them. These tropical plants will benefit from some time-to-time misting. Keep this plant away from children and pets as it is on the poisonous houseplant list.

Category: Thriller – Used as focal points and to create a dynamic visual composition.

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