Let’s Conserve! Teaching water sustainability at Luther Burbank MS

Oct 14, 2011

Water is one of our most precious and valuable resources, and there is increasing concern over us approaching its limits. For this reason, it’s becoming increasingly important to educate our youth—and each other—about water conservation and sustainability.

At Luther Burbank Middle School in Los Angeles, one inspiring teacher—Jamie Wisehaupt—uses her Woolly School Garden to teach her students about water sustainability in California. She covers important topics, such as “how we get our water supply, how to recharge our local water table and most importantly choices we can make as a community to encourage responsible water usage.” With the help of two students from Woodbury University, Jamie created a California Natives garden in order to demonstrate why we should consider planting “California-native plants as opposed to all these plants that come from other parts of the world.”

As a result, Jamie’s students have become increasingly interested in California-native plants, especially cacti and other succulents—which, of course, don’t need much water!

Jamie and her students decided as a class that they wanted to create a vertical garden using succulents. “While our plants are still small” Jamie explains, “they are thriving in the pockets and are enjoying the California sunshine.”

I suppose this is what I truly love about the Woolly School Garden Program—how every school uses the program in their own unique way! Thank you for sharing your story with us, Jamie.

How are you using your pockets? Let us know! Email us at pr@woollypocket.com

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