Featured in Serendipity Magazine

Jul 09, 2013

Woolly Pocket is featured in the August 2013 issue of Serendipity. Here’s a snippet of the wonderful article about vertical gardening.

Add drama and whimsy by growing a garden up your wall instead of outside your window. What has been predominantly a corporate trend of late is now becoming increasingly popular in residential design, says Colin Coogan, co-founder of Green Up, a design firm and garden center in Stamford, CT. A vertical garden can be a show-stopping full wall of greenery separating one room from another, or a simple decorative element. Even more than that, it’s a great way to improve your indoor air quality, and to grow your own fresh vegetables or herbs, especially when you live in town or in a city.

How The Concept Grew
Vertical gardening was popularized partly by French botanical designer Patrick Blanc, says Robin Plaskoff Horton, founder and creative director of urbangardensweb.com, a blog that focuses on city living, innovative design and nature. “Blanc brought a somewhat old concept into the design realm,” says Horton. “They add color and texture to a design scheme, creating a focal point or camouflaging a flaw.”

What is a vertical garden?
All vertical gardens are essentially made of either pockets or shelves so plants can be stacked one on top of the other while still leaving room for them to grow. Woolly Pocket is a popular choice. This company makes thick felt panels of pockets that can be hung on the wall. You can put the plants in potting soil in these pockets, or wrap the plants’ roots in felt and feed them with an automatic tube.

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